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Gabrielle Lurie, Chronicle photographer, named Pulitzer finalist

San Francisco Chronicle staff photographer Gabrielle Lurie was named a finalist Monday for the Pulitzer Prize in feature photography.

Lurie was recognized for her photos with a Chronicle story about a woman who set out to save her daughter from a fentanyl addiction on the streets of San Francisco. Judges called the photos “intimate and harrowing.”

“It’s really exciting, and I’m so glad the story resonated with people,” Lurie said. “I’m really, really grateful that Jessica and Laurie opened up with me and with us, with the readers. I’m really grateful to Nicole (Fruge), my boss, for elevating photography as an important way to tell a story, and not just as art to accompany one.”

“Gabrielle Lurie was driven to make images worthy of the trust that Laurie and Jessica placed in her,” said Nicole Fruge, The Chronicle’s director of visuals. “She spent countless hours, working at great personal risk, to document the harrowing impact of fentanyl. This kind of local journalism meticulously lays bare a crisis that San Francisco’s leaders have not been able to solve while lives hang in the balance.”

Laurie arrived in San Francisco with only about $1,000, mostly donations from family.  She rented a room in a Bayview neighborhood home for $1,100 a month — exactly double what she paid for rent in Port Orchard, Wash.

Laurie arrived in San Francisco with only about $1,000, mostly donations from family. She rented a room in a Bayview neighborhood home for $1,100 a month — exactly double what she paid for rent in Port Orchard, Wash.

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

Jessica sits on her suitcase on Turk Street after smoking crack.  When Jessica appeared in a 2013 episode of the National Geographic show “Drugs Inc.,” she looked into the camera and said, “Somebody told me when I first moved here, 'People don't come here to live.  They come here to die.'  I'm hoping I don't make that statistical true.”

Jessica sits on her suitcase on Turk Street after smoking crack. When Jessica appeared in a 2013 episode of the National Geographic show “Drugs Inc.,” she looked into the camera and said, “Somebody told me when I first moved here, ‘People don’t come here to live. They come here to die.’ I’m hoping I don’t make that statistical true.”

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

Laurie Steves, 56, cries out of frustration after several unsuccessful attempts to find her daughter Jessica DiDia, who is homeless and addicted to fentanyl, in the Tenderloin neighborhood in San Francisco.

Laurie Steves, 56, cries out of frustration after several unsuccessful attempts to find her daughter Jessica didaywho is homeless and addicted to fentanyl, in the Tenderloin neighborhood in San Francisco.

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

Jessica smokes a cigarette with mom Laurie on Ellis Street in the Tenderloin.  Laurie tried to stay positive, but she sometimes found herself reflecting on her regrets about her as a mom.

Jessica smokes a cigarette with mom Laurie on Ellis Street in the Tenderloin. Laurie tried to stay positive, but she sometimes found herself reflecting on her regrets about her as a mom.

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

Laurie wheels Jessica into St. Francis Hospital.  Jessica was hit by a car and hurt her knee but never made it beyond the waiting room;  she hates hospitals and says fentanyl helps with an intense pain in her left leg.

Laurie wheels Jessica into St. Francis Hospital. Jessica was hit by a car and hurt her knee but never made it beyond the waiting room; she hate hospitals and says fentanyl helps with an intense pain in her left leg.

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

Laurie watches an episode of the TV series “Private Practice”' in which a character overdoses on drugs.  By the end of July, Laurie realized her quest from her was pointless.

Laurie watches an episode of the TV series “Private Practice”’ in which a character overdoses on drugs. By the end of July, Laurie realized her quest from her was pointless.

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

The Pictures of the Year International competition named Lurie the Local Photographer of the Year in February, for the second year in a row.

“Gabrielle is a fearless truth teller who has dedicated herself to shedding light on living conditions in the Tenderloin,” said Editor in Chief Emilio Garcia-Ruiz. “Her photographs of the crisis are taken with great care, and her work by Ella reflects a rare compassion for her subjects who are often going through very difficult moments.”

The Pulitzer Prize in feature photography went to Reuters photographers Adnan Abidi, Sanna Irshad Mattoo, Amit Dave and Danish Siddiqui for their images depicting the impact of COVID-19 in India.

After nearly 10 years and ducking Laurie for weeks, Jessica finally reunited with her mom following a chance encounter on the street.  They had lunch at Denny's on Mission Street.  They spent a few hours together, and Jessica used drugs three times.  She agreed to meet her mother de ella the next day, but did not show up.

After nearly 10 years and ducking Laurie for weeks, Jessica finally reunited with her mom following a chance encounter on the street. They had lunch at Denny’s on Mission Street. They spent a few hours together, and Jessica used drugs three times. She agreed to meet her mother de ella the next day, but did not show up.

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

Jessica looks at her needle, which isn't properly registering into her arm, as she shoots crystal meth with friend Rasool (right) on Turk Street.

Jessica looks at her needle, which isn’t properly registering into her arm, as she shoots crystal meth with friend Rasool (right) on Turk Street.

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

Laurie and Jessica embrace before Laurie leaves town.  Laurie had upturned her life for 3½ months, but Jessica's life remained exactly the same.

Laurie and Jessica embrace before Laurie leaves town. Laurie had upturned her life for 3½ months, but Jessica’s life remained exactly the same.

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

Jessica smokes crack on Eddy Street after her mom moved back to Washington, having failed to get Jessica to agree to get help.  “It's like a vortex,” Jessica said of life on the streets in San Francisco.  “I want to get out of here.  But why the f— would I leave here if I have everything I need given to me?”

Jessica smokes crack on Eddy Street after her mom moved back to Washington, having failed to get Jessica to agree to get help. “It’s like a vortex,” Jessica said of life on the streets in San Francisco. “I want to get out of here. But why the f— would I leave here if I have everything I need given to me?”

Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle

—Andy Picón

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